JULY BOOK WRAP UP

This has been the first month that I’ve been really using my Kindle, back to back. I wasn’t sure if I would like it or not because I can’t do audiobooks, but I’m so happy that I’m loving it! After traveling back in March, I was so frustrated because I was working on a 500+ page book and couldn’t take it with me because it wouldn’t fit in my suitcase or my camera backpack. I just wanted to finish that one and have one or two others incase I finished that one. Is that too much to ask?!

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The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani

Synopsis: A mother comes home to find that her nanny killed her kids. It’s the worst nightmare of every parent. The story then goes back in time in the events that lead up to her children’s’ deaths. The mother, Myriam, wants to return to work after being a stay at home mom. When her and her husband look for nannies, they come across the perfect nanny- Louise.

Thoughts: I was excited to read this because it was listed in the NYT top 10 books of the year. I thought the story was a little lagging. I was expecting more drama and more excitement, but I felt the buildup wasn’t worth it. I came to understand that anyone can snap, which isn’t new.

⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

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How to Walk Away by Katherine Center

Synopsis: Margaret gets engaged to her prince charming and then her world is flipped upside down due to a horrific accident. She wakes up in the hospital and has to navigate a whole new life. Will her fiance stick around? Will she be able to figure out this new life?

Thoughts: Apologizes for the worst photo, but this book was so beautiful. I feel like the romance genre gets a bad wrap, but this one was so unexpected. It gave me hope in the worst situations and it brings to light how you can feel everything when you’re at your worst. I think everyone thinks about this once in a while: if I were in an accident would my partner stick around? Would I stick around for them? You never truly know until you’re put to the test. This book pushes all of those limits. I can’t wait to read more Katherine Center books.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

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The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

Synopsis: Tiffy and her boyfriend broke up and she needs to move immediately. Leon works night shifts and needs some extra money so he decides to rent out his apartment while he’s not there. The flatshare means that they will share everything, including a bed, but don’t have any plans to meet in real life. It’s a weird set up, but they are both so desperate that they overlook the weirdness. Over time, they start chatting with some notes about leftovers, leaving the toilet seat up, and soon they’re leaving paragraphs for each other. If they meet will it ruin everything or will they keep their arrangement to the post its?

Thoughts: I absolutely loved this book based on how original it was. I haven’t read anything with this sort premise before. It was another romance book that knocked it way out of the park. These two unlikely characters come together in a way that is so sweet. The ending wasn’t anything mind blowing but the way the story flows is so organic. There is some tough parts dealing with emotional abuse and a rough relationship, but I felt that it was so relatable to a lot of people that can’t see their toxic relationship for what it is until after they’re out. I can’t recommend this book enough!

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

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Stay Sexy and Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

Synopsis: Karen and Georgia share new stories, advice and how to value your personal safety over being nice. It flips back and forth between the two of them and their stories. They share about their addictions, eating disorders, mistakes, and other vulnerable topics.

Thoughts: I love the My Favorite Murder podcasts so I was more than happy to buy this book to support my fellow Murderinos. I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book because the whole podcast is based on murder, but that would be pretty excessive for a book. Georgia and Karen are so open with their lives and with everything that led them up to where they are now. The writing is exactly like how they talk so the whole book felt very conversational. They shared some very personal stories that even had me tearing up at times, especially when Karen talked about her mom’s battle with Alzheimer’s. If you like the podcast or are looking for a book that’s very open about struggles, this is your next read.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

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To Night Owl From Dogfish

Synopsis: Bett finds out her dad has a secret boyfriend, and he’s scheming to send her to a camp with the daughter of his boyfriend. Their hope is that they become BFFs, and then they tell them that they are dating. Bett doesn’t like this plan so she emails Avery to tell her what’s going on and how she isn’t going to go along with any of it.

Thoughts: This adorable Parent Trap like story was my first Middle Grade novels, and I couldn’t have loved it more. This whole story is told through mostly emails, a few letters, and a voicemail. I enjoy switching up my genres so it was really great to be in this world of tweens. It’s so easy to forget how it felt to be that age and be steamrolled by your parents. It was a quick read and perfect for summer.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

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My Family Divided: One Girl’s Journey of Home, Loss, and Hope by Diane Guerrero with Erica Moroz

Synopsis: Diane comes home from school one day to find an empty house and that her undocumented parents have been taken and are about to be deported. She is left all alone, not only because her parents are gone but because the government never comes to see her. For all they know, she doesn’t exist. She is left to find housing, graduate from high school, and figure out life all by herself.

Thoughts: I know Diane from Orange is the New Black and Jane, The Virgin. I think she’s so great, so when I heard on a book podcast (All the Books) that her parents were deported when she was in high school and she was left all alone, I was shocked, horrified, and so deeply sad for her. With the horrific situation at the border, this story felt so timely. It’s unimaginable how kids can come home to an empty house because their parents have been taken by ICE. I don’t know if there is anything scarier. Her story broke my heart over and over again because that is such a real possibility for so many. This book absolutely brings hope, but it’s a hard ride to get there. I hope that this book will help others in a similar situation, and that friends will step up and care for anyone who is in a situation as awful as this.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

July Wrap Up

The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani ⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

How to Walk Away by Katherine Center ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

Stay Sexy and Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

To Night Owl From Dogfish ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

My Family Divided: One Girl’s Journey of Home, Loss, and Hope by Diane Guerrero with Erica Moroz ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5